Category Archives: Research & Statistics

Advancing a Unique American Industry

When people think of U.S. film and television production, they tend to think of “Hollywood,” New York and other leading American filmmaking communities. But increasingly today, film and television production is a nationwide growth engine that is bringing new jobs and economic opportunities to communities across the country. From Pontiac, Michigan, to Albuquerque, New Mexico, to Chicago, Illinois, to New Orleans, Louisiana, film and television production is lifting communities in all 50 states in our union today.

Some facts you might not know about our industry:

  • We are a national community of 2.5 million creative professionals–costume designers to make-up artists, stuntmen to set builders, writers to actors–who work in all 50 states of our union.
  • We are a powerful engine of economic growth that contributes nearly $80 billion annually to the U.S. economy.
  • We are an industry overwhelmingly comprised of middle-class workers earning a living wage.
  • We are a professional community that contributes $13 billion annually to federal and state tax coffers.
  • We are the only American industry to run a positive balance of trade in every country in which we do business.
    • The Domestic box office continued to grow in 2008, reaching $9.79 billion after a 1.7% gain. (refer to page 3 of the 2008 MPAA Theatrical Statistics report)
    • Worldwide box office reached another all-time high in 2008 at $28.1 billion, an increase of 5.2% over 2007. (refer to page 2 of the 2008 MPAA Theatrical Statistics report)
  • Domestic admissions dropped 2.6% in 2008, to 1.36 billion. (refer to page 3 of the 2008 MPAA Theatrical Statistics report)
    • The total number of films released domestically in 2008 was up 1.8%, to 610 films. (refer to page 5 of the 2008 MPAA Theatrical Statistics report)
    • In 2008, the average movie ticket price in the U.S. rose to $7.18, a 4.4% increase over 2007. (refer to page 4 of the 2008 MPAA Theatrical Statistics report)
  • The number of screens in the U.S. remain constant at just over 40,000 in 2008.